Media & Entertainment

Amongst the first to be targeted for piracy, now increasingly vulnerable to data ransom, distribution interference, and manipulation of content integrity.

 

Media and entertainment companies have seized on digital technologies to reinvent themselves – creating and delivering their products in new ways.  They have also harvested huge amounts of data to gain deeper insights into their customers’ behavior. With the advent of the online economy, the media and entertainment sectors have also been among the first to be targeted for piracy. Now increasingly they are vulnerable to data ransom, distribution interference, and manipulation of content integrity. As the Sony hack showed, the adversaries are now not just based in college dorms but include sophisticated criminals, activists, and even nation-state actors.  Further, pre-production executives increasingly worry about maintaining control over their creative work prior to distribution.  Journalists and newsrooms worry about law enforcement, intelligence, and activists seizing details of their sources or distorting their news stories.

  • STASH not only understands the challenge of keeping content secure. It helps media and entertainment leaders deliver content in very controlled manners. Now distribution deals can be negotiated with limited exposure.
  • STASH also offers entertainment providers with conversion to digital services as well as unique very-long-term storage and retrieval capability with no loss of integrity. Ensure the longevity and reliability of digital asset libraries for decades.

Nearly one year after the Sony hack, executives across the media business say the number of cyber attacks on their companies has only increased, according to a new survey. Of the 319 execs in the media business surveyed worldwide in May and June, 46% reported having been subject to cyberattacks over the past year from third parties such as hackers that targeted digital media in advance of a major launch such as theatrical or DVD releases. When asked the same question during the prior year, and only 29% reported such incursions. Hackers aren’t the only people media companies need to worry about; their own employees are becoming a more worrisome threat over the past year, according to 45% of those surveyed, as are vendors that work with the company (37%). Both employees and vendors were moderately less problematic last year.

“Cyber Attacks on the Rise in Media Biz Since Sony Hack: Survey”, Variety

As more media companies transform into truly digital businesses, their technologies and the data running through them become the business. Thus, any security breach could have a much greater impact than it would on a company less reliant on its digital assets. Leaders of digital businesses are rightly concerned about the myriad of threats that could inflict substantial harm on their companies and customers.

“The New Security Challenge Are Media & Entertainment Companies Ready?”, Accenture

In the last several years, hacktivists who oppose the protection of IP rights have targeted media companies when they engage in litigation to enforce their copyrights, or support IP protection legislation, such as the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA).Cyber resilience involves protecting the company’s “crown jewels,” or its key digital assets, including ideas. The foundation of resilience must begin with a vision and budget set by executive management and accountability established at the board or audit committee level.

``Cyber Resilience for the Entertainment Industry`` -Stroz Friedberg, Leading Experts in Intellectual Property